Home -  Call to Arms - Tioga Point - Chemung - Newtown - Aftermath - Links - Guestbook - E-mail

   

THE BATTLE OF NEWTOWN!

At noon on Aug. 22, Gen. Clinton arrived at Tioga Point (The Hudson Valley detachment were held up by the swollen streams and difficult terrain and failed to connect with Clintonís division) and was greeted by the cheers of all of the men there assembled and welcomed with a 13 gun salute.

After the arrival of the force under Clinton, preparations for the march northward into the Indian country were speeded up. On Aug. 26 the combined forces, numbering close to five thousand men, left Tioga Point. Their progress was slowed down by the treacherous terrain and the swollen river, and it was three days later, on Aug 29 before they reached the Indian village of Newtown.


SIGN SHOWING LOCATION OF INDIAN BREASTWORKS IN PRESENT DAY LOWMAN, NY

The enemy forces had thrown up a breastworks concealed by freshly cut saplings. In front flowed Baldwin's Creek and on their left flank was an extensive swamp. At their rear was a high hill (present location of Newtown Battlefield Reservation) and on their right passed the old Indian trail over which Sullivan should advance. Some 200 yards beyond this trail lay a wooded ridge where British forces were hidden. Thus, the trap was set.


MAP OF GEN. SULLIVAN'S PLAN OF ATTACK

Sullivanís scouts discovered the ambush and sent word back to their commander. General Sullivan sent Col. Ogden to the far left and Clinton and Poorís brigades to the right to gain the enemyís flank and rear. Col. Proctorís artillery was moved to within 300 yards of the breastworks. At a prearranged time the artillery began a heavy fire and the plan went into action.


SIGN MARKING LOCATION OF SULLIVAN'S RIFLE CORPS IN PRESENT DAY LOWMAN, NY

Poor and Clinton were delayed by the swamp but eventually gained high ground and engaged in active combat with the enemy. For awhile it was a hotly contested battle, but eventually the vigorous artillery fire had a telling effect on the Indians and the signal for retreat was sounded by the Indian leaders. The defeated Tories and Indians fled up the valley crossing the river and taking to the hills.


SIGN SHOWING WHERE THE FORCES OF PORR AND CLINTON ADVANCED ON THE ENEMY IN PRESENT DAY LOWMAN, NY

The colonials lost 3 killed and 36 wounded. Of the enemy 12 were found slain on the ground and 2 were taken prisoners, the wounded were carried off by the Indians in their retreat. The victorious Colonials pursued them for a short distance, but without much result. Thus the Battle of Newtown ended in a victory for Sullivanís army.


BOULDER MARKING THE AREA IN WHICH THE BATTLE TOOK PLACE
 IN PRESENT DAY LOWMAN, NY

2000@ thetwintiers.com All Rights Reserved